RE/MAX Area Real Estate Network LTD | Manchester NH Real Estate, Stratham NH Real Estate, Bedford NH


A home appraisal is paramount for a house seller. If a seller enters the real estate market with an appraisal report in hand, he or she can use the report's property valuation to determine the optimal price for a residence. Then, this individual can set an aggressive price for his or her house from day one of the home selling journey.

Ultimately, not all home appraisers are equal. Some of the key factors to consider as you weigh the pros and cons of hiring a home appraiser include:

1. Industry Experience

Hire a home appraiser who knows the ins and outs of the real estate industry – you will be happy you did. If you have a real estate expert at your side, you can receive a data-driven appraisal of your house.

Oftentimes, it helps to perform lots of research before you hire a house appraiser. If you reach out to an appraiser directly, you can learn about his or her industry expertise. Plus, you can use this opportunity to receive immediate responses to any home appraisal questions.

2. Client Referrals

Although it may be tough to determine exactly how an appraiser will analyze a house, it generally is a good idea to explore how past clients feel about this professional. If you request client referrals, you can get in touch with an appraiser's past clients. You then can receive firsthand insights about what it is like to work with this appraiser.

Typically, a home appraiser can provide client referrals upon request. If you allocate time and resources to request client referrals and connect with an appraiser's past clients, you could increase your chances of hiring a top-notch appraiser to assess your residence.

3. Your Home Selling Timeline

There is no guarantee that a home appraiser will be available on short notice. If you are operating on a tight home selling timeline, you may want to reach out to multiple home appraisers in your city or town. That way, you can find a first-rate home appraiser who can review your residence right away.

As you get set to add your house to the real estate market, you may want to hire a real estate agent, too. This housing market professional can put you in touch with the top home appraisers in your area. Also, he or she is happy to lend a helping hand at each stage of the property selling journey.

Let's not forget about the assistance that a real estate agent will provide after you list your house, either. At this point, a real estate agent will promote your residence to potential buyers. And if you receive an offer to purchase your house, a real estate agent will help you make an informed decision about whether to accept, reject or counter this proposal.

Ready to add your house to the real estate market? Hire a home appraiser, and you can receive a property valuation that you can use to price your residence competitively from day one of the house selling journey.


Resourcefulness is a key trait of a successful home seller, and perhaps it is easy to understand why.

Typically, a resourceful home seller will be able to identify opportunities to promote his or her residence in any real estate market, at any time. This home seller also will know what it takes to accelerate the property selling cycle and maximize the value of his or her residence.

So what does it take to become a resourceful home seller? Here are three tips to help you do just that.

1. Learn About the Housing Market

The housing market can be difficult to navigate, particularly for a first-time property seller. Fortunately, housing market data is readily available and can provide you many insights that can help you become a resourceful home seller.

For example, home sellers can check out the prices of houses that are similar to their own any time they choose. With this housing market data in hand, property sellers can understand how their residences stack up against the competition.

Home sellers also should evaluate the prices of recently sold residences in their city or town. That way, home sellers can find out whether they are preparing to enter a seller's or buyer's market.

2. Understand Your House's Strengths and Weaknesses

Although you've allocated substantial time and resources to maintain your residence over the years, it is important to realize that no house is perfect. However, a resourceful home seller will understand his or her property's strengths and weaknesses and plan accordingly.

A home appraisal offers a great learning opportunity for a home seller. During this appraisal, a property inspector will examine a home both inside and out. Then, a home seller will receive a report that outlines a house's pros and cons.

After a home appraisal, a property seller may be better equipped than ever before to establish a competitive price for his or her house. As a result, this home seller can boost his or her chances of speeding up the property selling process.

3. Collaborate with a Real Estate Agent

Even resourceful home sellers know that navigating the property selling journey on their own can be tough. Luckily, real estate agents are available who can help you analyze the housing market and get the best results during the home selling journey.

A real estate agent can help you set up home showings and open houses, negotiate with homebuyers and much more. In addition, a real estate agent will learn about your home selling goals and work with you to achieve them quickly and effortlessly.

Perhaps best of all, a real estate agent can provide you with home selling resources and insights that you may struggle to obtain elsewhere. He or she can teach you about the ins and outs of the real estate market and ensure you can seamlessly sell your house.

Get ready to sell your house – use these tips, and you can become a resourceful home seller.


A home listing often introduces a homebuyer to a residence. It may include home photos, a brief home description and details about various home features and amenities. As such, an effective home listing is a must-have, particularly for a home seller who wants to stir up plenty of interest in a residence.

Ultimately, there are several best practices to consider when you create a home listing, and these include:

1. Provide Accurate Information

Learn about your home, and you can provide accurate information about your residence in your home listing.

If you're unsure about your home's condition, it often pays to complete a home appraisal. That way, a property appraiser can evaluate your residence both inside and out, identify any problem areas and offer a property valuation.

Furthermore, if you recently completed assorted home improvements, you should include information about these upgrades in your home listing.

Whether it's new windows that you installed throughout your residence or an updated home air conditioning system, including details about various home upgrades in your home listing could help your residence stand out to potential buyers.

2. Include High-Quality Photos

You don't need to be a professional photographer to capture high-quality photos of your house. In fact, many smartphones and tablets feature first-rate cameras, and you can use these mobile devices to take photos of your house's interior or exterior.

As you photograph your home, remember the homebuyer's perspective. For instance, a homebuyer likely wants to see photos of a clean, pristine kitchen and other awe-inspiring images of your house. If you clean and declutter your house before a photo shoot, you can increase the likelihood that your home photos will capture homebuyers' attention.

On the other hand, if you want professional assistance, you can always reach out to a real estate photographer as well. A real estate photographer can offer home photo recommendations and suggestions and help you capture photos that show off the true size and beauty of your residence.

3. Collaborate with a Real Estate Agent

A real estate agent knows what it takes to craft an effective home listing. Therefore, if you collaborate with a real estate agent, you should have no trouble creating a home listing that hits the mark with homebuyers.

Typically, a real estate agent will meet with you, learn about your home selling goals and plan accordingly. He or she then will use the information that you provide to develop an engaging home listing.

With a real estate agent at your side, you can seamlessly navigate the home selling journey too.

For instance, a real estate agent will host open houses and set up home showings to promote your residence to homebuyers. Plus, he or she will keep you up to date about any home offers and provide expert advice at each stage of the home selling journey.

Creating an effective home listing may seem difficult. Fortunately, if you use the aforementioned best practices, you can craft a home listing that can help you generate substantial interest in your residence.


For home sellers, renting a storage unit may prove to be a great idea, and perhaps it is easy to understand why.

A storage unit will make it simple to keep personal belongings like artwork and photographs out of sight while you sell your house. Plus, a storage unit offers a secure space for your personal belongings, one that you can quickly and effortlessly access at any time.

Although there are many wonderful reasons to rent a storage unit, choosing the right-size unit can be difficult, particularly for a first-time home seller. Lucky for you, we're here to help take the guesswork out of selecting a storage unit that suits you perfectly.

Now, let's take a look at three tips to help a home seller choose the right-size storage unit.

1. Take a Look at the Items That You Need to Store

A home seller must do everything possible to remove clutter before listing a house. And with a storage unit at your disposal, you should have no trouble keeping excess items outside your residence.

Ultimately, it is important to make a list of the items that you want to place in storage before you rent a storage unit. This will help you determine exactly how much space you'll need based on the items on your list.

For example, if you need to store a bicycle, treadmill or other large items, you may want to choose a 10' x 15' storage unit. Or, if you need to store boxes of kitchen utensils, bathroom supplies and various small items, a 5' x 5' storage unit may prove to be the ideal choice.

2. Consider How Long You'll Need a Storage Unit

With the right-size storage unit, you can protect various personal belongings until a homebuyer purchases your residence.

As you explore your storage unit options, it often helps to create a budget. That way, you can ensure that you'll have sufficient finances available to cover the costs of a storage unit for an extended period of time.

If you are unsure about your long-term finances, you may want to rent a small storage unit, thereby resulting in affordable monthly storage unit rental costs. On the other hand, if you feel comfortable with your financial situation, you may be better equipped than others to select a large storage unit.

3. Consult with a Real Estate Agent

Determining how much space you'll need in a storage unit can challenge even the most diligent home seller. Thankfully, a real estate agent can help you prepare your residence for the housing market as well as make it easy to decide how much storage space you'll need.

A real estate agent can put you in touch with storage unit providers in your city or town. In addition, he or she can offer home decluttering tips and help you get excess items into the right-size storage unit in no time at all.

Ready to rent a storage unit? With the aforementioned tips, you can select the right-size storage unit to safeguard myriad personal belongings while you sell your house.



 Photo by bidvine via Pixabay

Some home projects and improvements can't wait - a leaking hot water heater or a water damaged floor need to be replaced right away. Other, planned renovations and upgrades are optional. Consider not only your current needs, but the potential impact of any large planned upgrade on your home's value before you proceed. If you are upgrading your home to sell it soon, the improvements you make should add value to your home and be recouped when you are ready to sell. 

4 Home Improvements that Add the Most Value to your Home (and 3 That Don't)

Some upgrades enhance the overall value of your home, while others allow you to improve the look of your home, and recover the majority of your costs when you sell. According to Bankrate.com, the best places to invest your upgrade dollars include: 

A new garage door: It may not be fancy or a feature you notice, but replacing a sagging, out of date or ailing garage door with a newer, more secure model is a money savvy upgrade. The average garage upgrade costs about $3,600 -- and adds about $3,500 to the selling price of the home, making this a renovation that (almost) pays for itself. 

Kitchen Update: Bringing a dated or worn kitchen up to current day standards -- a makeover that usually costs about $22,000 for the average home -- can improve the selling price of your home by thousands of dollars. The average kitchen update boosts the value of a home by up to $18,000.

Enhance your yard with a deck: According to the Balance, adding a deck in your backyard expands your living space and allows you to add value to your home. The average cost of a wood deck is $10,000 -- and that deck adds an average of $9000 to your home's value, making it easy to add space without a huge investment. 

Replace siding: The curb appeal of your home has a significant impact on your ability to sell it and on the price you receive. According to the Balance, replacing aging siding with a similar quality new version allows you to recover about 75% of your investment. It will also make your home more appealing to buyers. 

Projects that Don't Add Value to your Home

You should not take on these projects if you truly want to enjoy the results for a while, as they won't have much of an impact on the selling price or value of your home. Some, like swimming pools, can even scare away buyers that would otherwise be interested in your property. According to the Balance, the worst home upgrades include swimming pools of all types, interior painting (because buyers may prefer different colors) and whole roof replacement (except in emergencies).  

 




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